Rebuild Ocean Abundance

Rebuild Ocean Abundance

Bringing fish populations back to health for thriving coastal communities and abundant oceans

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Rebuild Ocean Abundance

For five years Oceana Canada has audited the health of wild fish and how the government manages fisheries. The results, Canada is failing its oceans and coastal communities, but we can change this.

FISHERY AUDIT 2021

Oceana Canada’s annual Fishery Audit reports on the state of fish stocks and tracks progress on how well the government is meeting its policy and management commitments. Five year’s of Fishery Audits reveal the government’s failure to significantly improve how Canada’s fisheries are managed. Less than a third of marine fish and invertebrate stocks can be confidently considered healthy and the status of another third is uncertain, primarily due to a lack of data. Nearly one in five are critically depleted and more than 80 per cent of them lack rebuilding plans, which outline how and when a population will be brought back to healthy levels.

FIND OUR MORE ABOUT CANADA’S FISHERIES AT FISHERYAUDIT.CA

Add your name to help call on the Canadian government to rebuild Canada’s fish populations back to healthy levels here

 
 

Victory: Canada now has a modernized Fisheries Act, making rebuilding fish populations the law. 

Oceana Canada is working to rebuild abundance in Canada’s fisheries. In the 1950s, Canada had the seventh most productive wild fishery in the world. Today, we have dropped to 21st place. By consistently implementing internationally proven principles of fisheries management, we can recover our threatened fish populations.

To accomplish this, Oceana Canada’s campaigns address significant barriers to fisheries recovery, tackling issues that offer the greatest potential to restore Canada’s depleted fish populations within our lifetime.

Oceans of Opportunity: The Economic Case for Rebuilding Northern Cod

An Oceana Canada-commissioned study, Oceans of Opportunity: The economic case for rebuilding northern cod, found that a healthy northern cod fishery could provide 16 times more jobs and five times more economic value than what its worth today. With low fishing pressure and favourable environmental conditions, the fishery could recover in as few as 11 years, supporting 26,000 jobs and increasing in value to $233 million in today’s dollars. This study shows that the long-term potential of this fishery vastly outweighs the limited returns we might get from it now. The good news is that northern cod has tremendous potential to bounce back to healthy levels and support a lucrative, sustainable fishery.

Oceana Canada is calling on Fisheries and Oceans Canada to set a quota and implement a rebuilding plan that supports recovering the population and allowing the fishery to achieve its full potential.

Read Oceans of Opportunity: The economic case for rebuilding northern cod here

 

Victories

June, 2019

Shark fin trade banned in Canada

Importing and exporting shark fins is now banned in Canada. The practice of shark finning has been illegal in Canadian waters for years; however, Canada was the largest importer of shark fins outside of Asia. A grassroots effort by Oceana Canada pushed for the passage of Bill S-238, to ban the importation and exportation of shark fins. This effort resulted in more than 300,000 petition signatures and thousands of emails and phone calls being made to Members of Parliament calling on them to protect sharks. This public support and campaigning by Oceana Canada and other groups led to Bill S-238 being incorporated into Canada’s new Fisheries Act which passed into law on June 18, 2019.

June, 2019

Modernized Fisheries Act an historic victory for fisheries rebuilding

After four years of campaigning by Oceana Canada and its allies, a modernized Fisheries Act became law, setting the stage for rebuilding ocean abundance. This new legislation is an historic change in how Canada manages its fisheries: for the first time since the Fisheries Act was enacted in 1868, the government now must manage fish populations sustainably and put in place plans to help those that are depleted rebuild back to healthy levels. Rebuilding means more fish which could support more jobs and all of the social, cultural and economic benefits that come with healthy oceans full of life.

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Rebuild wild fish populations

LESS THAN ONE-THIRD OF CANADA'S FISHERIES ARE CONSIDERED HEALTHY, ADD YOUR NAME AND TELL THE GOVERNMENT TO FIX THIS CRISIS

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